16 Psychological Reasons Good People Do Bad Things

A good read over morning tea. 

This article lists some great examples and studies in which good people make unethical decisions and the reasoning behind it. 

http://thatscienceguy.tumblr.com/post/66214673080

thatscienceguy:

There is a chemical out there, a Dangerous Chemical. It is the direct cause of death of 388,000 deaths each year.

Inhaling/consuming too much can kill you.

It is found in every cancer cell, and if taken away the cancer dies very quickly.

It makes acids extremely more potent.

So what is the…

Investigate “claims” for yourself.

chibird:

Daytime worries too. What can you do but try not to worry and think positively. ^^;

Let’s add health problems to the mix.

accordingtodevin:

Scientifically accurate love story.

(via comaniddy)

mathmajik:

MATH MYTHS: (from Mind over Math)

1. MEN ARE BETTER IN MATH THAN WOMEN.
Research has failed to show any difference between men and women in mathematical ability. Men are reluctant to admit they have problems so they express difficulty with math by saying, “I could do it if I tried.” Women are often too ready to admit inadequacy and say, “I just can’t do math.”

2. MATH REQUIRES LOGIC, NOT INTUITION.
Few people are aware that intuition is the cornerstone of doing math and solving problems. Mathematicians always think intuitively first. Everyone has mathematical intuition; they just have not learned to use or trust it. It is amazing how often the first idea you come up with turns out to be correct.

3. MATH IS NOT CREATIVE.
Creativity is as central to mathematics as it is to art, literature, and music. The act of creation involves diametrical opposites—working intensely and relaxing, the frustration of failure and elation of discovery, satisfaction of seeing all the pieces fit together. It requires imagination, intellect, intuition, and aesthetic about the rightness of things.

4. YOU MUST ALWAYS KNOW HOW YOU GOT THE ANSWER.
Getting the answer to a problem and knowing how the answer was derived are independent processes. If you are consistently right, then you know how to do the problem. There is no need to explain it.

5. THERE IS A BEST WAY TO DO MATH PROBLEMS.
A math problem may be solved by a variety of methods which express individuality and originality-but there is no best way. New and interesting techniques for doing all levels of mathematics, from arithmetic to calculus, have been discovered by students. The way math is done is very individual and personal and the best method is the one which you feel most comfortable.

6. IT’S ALWAYS IMPORTANT TO GET THE ANSWER EXACTLY RIGHT.
The ability to obtain approximate answer is often more important than getting exact answers. Feeling about the importance of the answer often are a reversion to early school years when arithmetic was taught as a feeling that you were “good” when you got the right answer and “bad” when you did not.

7. IT’S BAD TO COUNT ON YOUR FINGERS.
There is nothing wrong with counting on fingers as an aid to doing arithmetic. Counting on fingers actually indicates an understanding of arithmetic-more understanding than if everything were memorized.

8. MATHEMATICIANS DO PROBLEMS QUICKLY, IN THEIR HEADS.
Solving new problems or learning new material is always difficult and time consuming. The only problems mathematicians do quickly are those they have solved before. Speed is not a measure of ability. It is the result of experience and practice.

9. MATH REQUIRES A GOOD MEMORY.
Knowing math means that concepts make sense to you and rules and formulas seem natural. This kind of knowledge cannot be gained through rote memorization.

10. MATH IS DONE BY WORKING INTENSELY UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS SOLVED. Solving problems requires both resting and working intensely. Going away from a problem and later returning to it allows your mind time to assimilate ideas and develop new ones. Often, upon coming back to a problem a new insight is experienced which unlocks the solution.

11. SOME PEOPLE HAVE A “MATH MIND” AND SOME DON’T.
Belief in myths about how math is done leads to a complete lack of self-confidence. But it is self-confidence that is one of the most important determining factors in mathematical performance. We have yet to encounter anyone who could not attain his or her goals once the emotional blocks were removed.

12. THERE IS A MAGIC KEY TO DOING MATH.
There is no formula, rule, or general guideline which will suddenly unlock the mysteries of math. If there is a key to doing math, it is in overcoming anxiety about the subject and in using the same skills you use to do everything else.


Source: “Mind Over Math,” McGraw-Hill Book Company, pp. 30-43.

Revised: Summer 1999 
Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC)
Southwest Texas State University

Photo: http://math2033.uark.edu/wiki/index.php/MathBusters

Math myths busted!

(via women-in-science)

smarylove:

How To Make DIY Test Tube Vase

I have been intrigued with test tube crafts lately and thought this test tube vase is pretty different and cool.

I’m totally doing this! 

Colonies of Growing Bacteria Make Psychedelic Art

Images: 1) P. vortex exposed to a chemotherapy substance 2) P. vortex 3) Vortex Blue (P. vortex) 4) A close look at P. dendritiformis 5) Bacterial Dragon (Paenibacillus dendritiformis)

Israeli physicist Eshel Ben-Jacob uses bacteria as an art medium, shaping colonies in petri dishes into bold patterns

(via afro-dominicano)

Anthrax, dear NBC news, is not a virus, no matter how often you say “the anthrax virus.” Thanks.

Thank you!

23pairsofchromosomes:

A summary of bacteriophages

So over the last few weeks I have joined Martha Clokies lab at Leicester university to carry out research on the bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens. Over the next few day’s I’m going to post a few interesting pictures from experiments I have carried out over the course of the placement. 

For those who aren’t aware, bacteriophages are essentially the viruses of bacteria and there are almost an endless variety of these found throughout nature. They are being heralded as a new therapy for bacterial infections as the current problem of antibiotic resistance is becoming more and more of an issue. 

I am currently trying to isolate the phages for C.perfringens which is the causative agent of both food poisoning in humans and also necrotic enteritis in chickens (having massive implications on the agricultural industry).

I’m pretty excited about this placement as it’s giving me the chance to carry out my own research and input my own ideas. Hopefully by the end of the 8 weeks I’ll have something to show for it, but we’ll see.

Sam

THIS!!!

photojojo:

According to a recent EPA report, the average American produces 4 pounds of trash in a single day, nearly double the figure recorded in 1960.

In 7 Days of Garbage, photographer Gregg Segal photographs his friends and neighbors lying in the trash they produced in a single week.

Portraits Reflect the Amount of Trash We Create in a Single Week

via Slate

A picture is worth a thousand words

Yet these left me speechless…

mindblowingscience:

Itsy bitsy bacterium gets a bigger genetic code

They may look like any other microbe, but don’t be fooled. The bacteria growing in a Californian laboratory are the first organisms to have an expanded genetic code. Instead of four letters, their genetic alphabet has six, thanks to two artificial letters.

"We have created the first organism that stores increased genetic information," says Floyd Romesberg of the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla.

Life on Earth, from bacteria to humans, uses the same four “letters” or bases to build its DNA: A, T, C and G. But there are many alternative molecules. Romesberg previously built two artificial letters, d5SICS and dNaM, that work well with the natural enzymes that build DNA.

Now he has incorporated them into living E. coli bacteria. The cells naturally took them into their genome, making matching pairs that face each other on either side of the DNA double helix.

"It is astounding that it could work at all," says Aaron Leconte of Claremont McKenna College in California, who helped to design the new genetic letters but was not involved in the current project.

Factory microbes

Surprisingly, other than adding a transporter protein that carried the new genetic letters into the bacteria, the team did not have to modify the cells at all. “We did nothing to the DNA replication machinery,” say Romesberg. That is unexpected because cells are good at correcting mistakes in their DNA. Somehow d5SICS and dNaM evaded these repair mechanisms – perhaps because they are so different from the natural versions that the machinery couldn’t do anything to them.

At first, the extra letters were slipped into the bacteria far from working genes, to avoid disrupting their function. But Romesberg is now trying to put the letters into those genes, to coax the cells into producing unnatural proteins.

Nature only provides 20 amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Romesberg’s work makes it possible to incorporate an additional 152 artificial ones. That could lead to new materials like nanowires, which could help to make miniature versions of electrical components like batteries, and better drugs.

Ultimately, the idea is to build semi-synthetic cells that operate two separate genetic codes in parallel. The original genetic software would keep the cells alive, while a parallel synthetic or semi-synthetic genetic code would allow the cell to act as a micro-factory, producing useful materials.

Because they are alive, these microbial factories could harness the power of evolution to rapidly and automatically find the best material for a job. For instance, cells could produce thousands of variations on a successful antibiotic in a fraction of the time it would take traditional chemists.

Journal reference: Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature13314

kqedscience:

Mobile phones carry owners’ bacterial ‘fingerprint’

Smartphones reflect the personal microbial world of their owners, say US scientists.

More than 80% of the common bacteria that make up our personal bacterial “fingerprints” end up on their screens, a study suggests.”

Learn more from bbcnews.